Asics METASPEED Edge

#1
Until Asics released their comparisons of the types of runners that would benefit from the Metaspeed Sky vs the Metaspeed Edge, I never really had heard of any other company's research into this topic. I went back and looked at my own regular runs and races on Garmin. Usually I was around 1.25 meters per stride at 180 spm at around 7:30-7:40 pace regular runs. In a recent 5k, I was 1.5 meters per stride and 188 spm. I wonder if Running Warehouse or Asics could plug in numbers and tell you which shoe they think would benefit you more? I would be very interested in that information. I don't have a marathon on the schedule until January, but definitely would take that type of advice when deciding between the two Asics shoes.

Adding: in my most recent Marathon in Atlanta, 2020. My average stride was 1.36 meters with a 179 spm. Ended with a 2:54. So if my average daily run is around 180 with a stride of 1.25 meters or so, I guess I would fall into the "Sky" mold where I'm increasing my speed by just taking longer strides? Honestly, I thought I would be the other way around. I definitely run at a higher cadence in 5ks, maybe not as much in a marathon.
 
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RW Admin

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#2
Until Asics released their comparisons of the types of runners that would benefit from the Metaspeed Sky vs the Metaspeed Edge, I never really had heard of any other company's research into this topic. I went back and looked at my own regular runs and races on Garmin. Usually I was around 1.25 meters per stride at 180 spm at around 7:30-7:40 pace regular runs. In a recent 5k, I was 1.5 meters per stride and 188 spm. I wonder if Running Warehouse or Asics could plug in numbers and tell you which shoe they think would benefit you more? I would be very interested in that information. I don't have a marathon on the schedule until January, but definitely would take that type of advice when deciding between the two Asics shoes.

Adding: in my most recent Marathon in Atlanta, 2020. My average stride was 1.36 meters with a 179 spm. Ended with a 2:54. So if my average daily run is around 180 with a stride of 1.25 meters or so, I guess I would fall into the "Sky" mold where I'm increasing my speed by just taking longer strides? Honestly, I thought I would be the other way around. I definitely run at a higher cadence in 5ks, maybe not as much in a marathon.
Hi @RunTommy!,

Thanks for the question! This is really interesting. I passed the question along to one of the experts we work with at ASICS to inquire. If I'm understanding the information correctly, it seems you'd benefit from the Sky (based on the Marathon data). However, the 5k data does suggest the Edge might be a solid choice. I'm curious to see if there is a different recommendation based on the length of the race.
Thank you,


Justin
RW Staff
 
#3
I am curious for the Edge to arrive so we can see the differences between it and the Sky more clearly. While I love the scientific research they’ve done in creating these shoes I do have a feeling that it will end up being more about personal preference and comfort rather than pure numerical data. There are just too many variables that I’ve been thinking about. For example, just based on rough data I also seem to fall more into the “stride” category. However, when I start to fatigue on long runs/races I’ve definitely noticed that the first thing to go is my cadence. I usually can feel that start to decrease and have to make a mental effort to keep my cadence up. I’ve really enjoyed the fact that shoes like the Vaporfly 4%/Endorphin Pro do help me to keep up my cadence easier with their quick roll and bounce. All that to say... numbers would say I’m a stride runner but a shoe that assists with cadence would probably have a bigger impact for me on longer races.
I think it will be interesting to see how the designs differ exactly.
 

RW Admin

Administrator
Staff member
#4
Until Asics released their comparisons of the types of runners that would benefit from the Metaspeed Sky vs the Metaspeed Edge, I never really had heard of any other company's research into this topic. I went back and looked at my own regular runs and races on Garmin. Usually I was around 1.25 meters per stride at 180 spm at around 7:30-7:40 pace regular runs. In a recent 5k, I was 1.5 meters per stride and 188 spm. I wonder if Running Warehouse or Asics could plug in numbers and tell you which shoe they think would benefit you more? I would be very interested in that information. I don't have a marathon on the schedule until January, but definitely would take that type of advice when deciding between the two Asics shoes.

Adding: in my most recent Marathon in Atlanta, 2020. My average stride was 1.36 meters with a 179 spm. Ended with a 2:54. So if my average daily run is around 180 with a stride of 1.25 meters or so, I guess I would fall into the "Sky" mold where I'm increasing my speed by just taking longer strides? Honestly, I thought I would be the other way around. I definitely run at a higher cadence in 5ks, maybe not as much in a marathon.
Hi @RunTommy!,

Bob from ASICS was kind enough to lend some expertise for this. Below is his reply:

"The commenter is in an interesting spot and love their analysis- they landed on the right pick. I do think they'd enjoy EDGE for shorter races and it would still perform better than a lot of other flats on the market, but with a focus on Marathon training and their stride metrics, I'd tell them to utilize the SKY.

Stride runners do see a slight increase in cadence, as he noted, but the greater lengthening of the stride is what we want to focus on. He'd fall on the left below for a rough illustration, with his cadence (blue line)slightly increasing, but stride (orange line) increasing more.:"
1617719257276.png
We hope that helps!
Thank you,


Justin
RW Staff
 
#5
Hi @RunTommy!,

Bob from ASICS was kind enough to lend some expertise for this. Below is his reply:

"The commenter is in an interesting spot and love their analysis- they landed on the right pick. I do think they'd enjoy EDGE for shorter races and it would still perform better than a lot of other flats on the market, but with a focus on Marathon training and their stride metrics, I'd tell them to utilize the SKY.

Stride runners do see a slight increase in cadence, as he noted, but the greater lengthening of the stride is what we want to focus on. He'd fall on the left below for a rough illustration, with his cadence (blue line)slightly increasing, but stride (orange line) increasing more.:"
View attachment 82
We hope that helps!
Thank you,


Justin
RW Staff

Absolutely fantastic analysis. Thanks!
 
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