Postpartum return to running with fallen arches and bunions

#1
Hi! I've been easing back into running after having my beautiful baby. It is much harder than I expected it to be.

I started seeing a physical therapist for foot pain and she told me I had collapsed arches. I've been working on strengthening them, but I wasn't sure about shoe supports in my running shoes.

I currently have superfeet blues in my Brooks ghost and I'm starting to wonder if I'm doing something wrong. I'm in pain all the time. I've always had bunions, but they don't really bother me if I have wide shoes. Even my cushy Brooks adrenaline don't feel great.

Should I go for a zero drop shoe with my supports? Or am I creating a system where I am relying on support rather than strengthening my muscles?!

I should add that I always need shoes with wide toe boxes. I wanted to get back to half marathons in 2021, but I'm worried that at this rate I won't be ready.:coffee:
 

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#2
Hi! I've been easing back into running after having my beautiful baby. It is much harder than I expected it to be.

I started seeing a physical therapist for foot pain and she told me I had collapsed arches. I've been working on strengthening them, but I wasn't sure about shoe supports in my running shoes.

I currently have superfeet blues in my Brooks ghost and I'm starting to wonder if I'm doing something wrong. I'm in pain all the time. I've always had bunions, but they don't really bother me if I have wide shoes. Even my cushy Brooks adrenaline don't feel great.

Should I go for a zero drop shoe with my supports? Or am I creating a system where I am relying on support rather than strengthening my muscles?!

I should add that I always need shoes with wide toe boxes. I wanted to get back to half marathons in 2021, but I'm worried that at this rate I won't be ready.:coffee:
@mamasnoob,

Congratulations on your baby!

Also, welcome to the TR community.

First, I must say that I am not a medical professional. So, I will be speaking from my running retail experience and knowledge I've gained from the running industry. With that said, I'd suggest strength/PT training to (slowly) build up your strength and stability. I'd also recommend speaking to your PT about adding running into the mix and how you could do that best.

Certain products may help reduce or eliminate the discomfort you are feeling. Below are a couple of products that may help:
  • Hoka One One Bondi
    • This shoe is available in wides and comes with a significant amount of impact protection. It is inherently stable too. This means your foot should be stabilized (to a degree) without a specific stability shoe. There are two potential downsides to this shoe for you, though. The first is the overall width of the forefoot. I'm not sure, without fitting you in-person, how well this shoe would fit your foot. Second, the heel-to-toe drop is considerably lower than what you are currently in. So, it will take a little adjustment to get your body use to the drop.
  • Altra Paradigm
    • Similar to the Bondi above, the Paradigm has a lot of impact protection and some stability. The overall design is wider (though not a "true wide"). I've been experiencing some severe foot pain and started wearing this shoe as my daily trainer. The primary concern I'd have for you with this shoe is (again) related to heel-to-toe offset. It is a zero drop. So, you may need more time for your body to adjust to this shoe than you would need for even the Bondi.
  • Note: We have an excellent return policy that should give you the flexibility you need to try out one or both of these shoes.
Your Superfeet Blues should be functional for your needs, and I cannot see why they wouldn't be (without more context).

Please be patient with yourself and your body. You've just done something incredible! Through consistent practice and listening to your body, you should be back into half marathons.

Please let us know if you have any further questions and keep us up-to-date on your journey!


Justin
RW Staff
 
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